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Buddha's Proof of Having Become God

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This designates the Tathagata: "The Body of Dhamma", that is, "The Body of Brahma", or "Become Dhamma", that is, "Become Brahma". (Aganna Sutta)

Knowing, the Lord knows; Seeing, He sees.  He has become the eye, he has become knowledge, he has become the Law, he has become Brahma (the Supreme Brahman), he has become the speaker, proclaimer and the elucidator of meaning, the giver of the Deathless, The Lord of the Dhamma, The Tathagatha. (Madhupindaka Sutta)

Now if God really did come, wouldn't he know that there would be hundreds and thousands of false gurus/prophets following him claiming to be God or equal to Him like the Hindus who claim there were hundreds of gurus better than or equal to him and they don't need Buddha?  Would he not give some kind of proof to even nonbelievers to say, "Rejoice! The True Lord Has Come!" Anyone with a little imagination can make up a whole host of fantastic stories. Okay, you say that you're God -- PROVE IT!  PROVE IT!  Or beat it!

ONLY Buddha accommodates this and actually gives a proof.  So take that non-Buddhists. Buddha's proof will leave you and modern computer science and mathematics geeks amazed!  Only The One True God could know this so perfectly, cause remember, the One True God is the ultimate genius!

"And, monks, as long as this — my three-round, twelve-permutation knowledge ; vision concerning these four noble truths as they have come to be — was not pure, I did not claim to have directly awakened to the right self-awakening unexcelled in the cosmos with its deities, Maras, & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk. But as soon as this — my three-round, twelve-permutation knowledge & vision concerning these four noble truths as they have come to be — was truly pure, then I did claim to have directly awakened to the right self-awakening unexcelled in the cosmos with its deities, Maras & Brahmas, with its contemplatives & brahmans, its royalty & commonfolk. Knowledge & vision arose in me: 'Unprovoked is my release. This is the last birth. There is now no further becoming.'" (Dhammacakkappavatana Sutta)

The Four Noble Truths (Cattari Ariya Sacchani)

Fools look at it and say, Buddha was depressed since he talked about suffering so much -- such a negative religion, not life affirming at all -- poor, poor Buddha left his wife and child for this?! Others think this follows a traditional medical diagnosis.  So what are the 4 Noble Truths?  Is there something fantastic about these 4 Noble Truths? He said until he could fully awaken to these 4 Noble Truths, he did not claim COMPLETE enlightenment, thus having attained to the Highest Divinity.  In other words, here is his proof that he and not anyone else is THE Buddha, The All Knowing One, everyone else is an imposter!  Let's investigate.  WHAT DID BUDDHA DISCOVER UNDERNEATH THE BODHI TREE?

The First Noble Truth

 

dukkhaṃ ariyasaccaṃ: 

jātipi dukkhā jarāpi dukkhā vyādhipi dukkho maraṇampi dukkhaṃ appiyehi sampayogo dukkho piyehi vippayogo dukkho yampicchaṃ na labhati tampi dukkhaṃ saṅkhittena pańcupādānakkhandhā dukkhā".

"Suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, sickness is suffering, death is suffering, sorrow and lamentation, pain, grief and despair are suffering; association with the loathed is suffering, dissociation from the loved is suffering, not to get what one wants is suffering — in short, suffering is the five categories of clinging objects.

The Second Noble Truth

 

dukkhasamudayo ariyasaccaṃ: 

"yāyaṃ taṇhā ponobhavikā nandirāgasahagatā tatra tatrābhinandinī, seyyathīdaṃ: kāmataṇhā bhavataṇhā vibhavataṇhā" 

"The origin of suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

It is the craving that produces renewal of being accompanied by enjoyment and lust, and enjoying this and that; in other words, craving for sensual desires, craving for being, craving for non-being.

The Third Noble Truth

 

dukkhanirodho ariyasaccaṃ:

yo tassāyeva taṇhāya asesavirāganirodho cāgo paṭinissaggo mutti anālayo. 

"Cessation of suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

It is remainderless fading and ceasing, giving up, relinquishing, letting go and rejecting, of that same craving.

The Fourth Noble Truth

 

dukkhanirodhagāminī paṭipadā ariyasaccaṃ

ayameva ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo, seyyathīdaṃ: sammādiṭṭhi sammāsaṅkappo sammāvācā sammākammanto sammāājīvo sammāvāyāmo sammāsati sammāsamādhi. 

"The way leading to cessation of suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

It is simply the noble eightfold path, that is to say, right view, right intention; right speech, right action, right livelihood; right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH IN DETAIL:

Now the above is from the Dhammachakka Pavatan Sutta. Now we continue to detail the Noble Eightfold Path in the Mahasatipatthana Sutta

 

yaṃ kho bhikkhave dukkhe ńāṇaṃ dukkhasamudaye ńāṇaṃ dukkhanirodhe ńāṇaṃ dukkhanirodhagāminiyā paṭipadāya ńāṇaṃ, ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammādiṭṭhi. 

"And what is right view? Knowledge with regard to suffering, knowledge with regard to the origination of suffering, knowledge with regard to the cessation of suffering, knowledge with regard to the way of practice leading to the cessation of suffering: This is called right view.

Katamo ca bhikkhave sammāsaṅkappo? Nekkhammasaṅkappo abyāpādasaṅkappo avihiṃsāsaṅkappo. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammāsaṅkappo. 
"And what is right resolve? Aspiring to renunciation, to freedom from ill will, to harmlessness: This is called right resolve.

Katamā ca bhikkhave sammāvācā? Musāvādā veramaṇī, pisunāya vācāya veramaṇī, pharusāya vācāya veramaṇī. Samphappalāpā veramaṇī. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammāvācā
"And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech."

Katamo ca bhikkhave sammākammanto? Pāṇātipātā veramaṇī, adinnādānā veramaṇī, kāmesumicchācārā veramaṇī. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammākammanto.
And what is right action? Abstaining from taking life, from stealing, & from illicit sex. This is called right action.

Katamo ca bhikkhave sammāājīvo? Idha bhikkhave ariyasāvako micchāājīvaṃ pahāya sammāājīvena jīvikaṃ kappeti. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammāājīvo. 
"And what is right livelihood? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones, having abandoned dishonest livelihood, keeps his life going with right livelihood: This is called right livelihood.

Katamo ca bhikkhave sammāvāyāmo? Idha bhikkhave bhikkhu anuppannānaṃ pāpakānaṃ akusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ anuppādāya chandaṃ janeti vāyamati viriyaṃ ārabhati cittaṃ paggaṇhāti padahati. Uppannānaṃ pāpakānaṃ akusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ pahānāya chandaṃ janeti vāyamati viriyaṃ ārabhati, cittaṃ paggaṇhāti, padahati. Anuppannānaṃ kusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ uppādāya chandaṃ janeti vāyamati viriyaṃ ārabhati cittaṃ paggaṇhāti padahati. Uppannānaṃ kusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ ṭhitiyā asammosāya bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya bhāvanāya pāripūriyā chandaṃ janeti, vāyamati viriyaṃ ārabhati cittaṃ paggaṇhāti padahati. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammāvāyāmo. 
"And what is right effort? There is the case where a monk generates desire, endeavors, arouses persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the non-arising of evil, unskillful qualities that have not yet arisen... for the sake of the abandoning of evil, unskillful qualities that have arisen... for the sake of the arising of skillful qualities that have not yet arisen... (and) for the maintenance, non-confusion, increase, plenitude, development, & culmination of skillful qualities that have arisen: This is called right effort.

Katamā ca bhikkhave sammāsati? Idha bhikkhave bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ, vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ, citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ, dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammāsati. 
"And what is right mindfulness? There is the case where a monk remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. He remains focused on feelings in & of themselves... the mind in & of itself... mental qualities in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. This is called right mindfulness.

Katamo ca bhikkhave sammāsamādhi? Idha bhikkhave bhikkhu vivicceva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ pītisukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vitakkavicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodibhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhijaṃ pītisukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati. Sato ca sampajāno sukhańca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti, yantaṃ ariyā ācikkanti upekkhako satimā sukhavihārīti, taṃ tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassadomanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā adukkhamasukhaṃ upekkhāsatipārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati. Ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammāsamādhi. 
"And what is right concentration? There is the case where a monk — quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful (mental) qualities — enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. With the stilling of directed thoughts & evaluations, he enters & remains in the second jhana: rapture & pleasure born of composure, unification of awareness free from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance. With the fading of rapture, he remains equanimous, mindful, & alert, and senses pleasure with the body. He enters & remains in the third jhana, of which the Noble Ones declare, 'Equanimous & mindful, he has a pleasant abiding.' With the abandoning of pleasure & pain — as with the earlier disappearance of elation & distress — he enters & remains in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity & mindfulness, neither pleasure nor pain. This is called right concentration.

Did you see?  Did you see? Well, Buddha's disciples saw but after that there was a huge decline in mental ability and people just couldn't figure out what Buddha was talking about.  To summarize:

1) Suffering is a Noble Truth (5 Upadana Khanda: form, feeling, perception, derivative matter, consciousness) (Suffering = True) Parse 5 clinging Khanda
2) Suffering has an origin is a Noble Truth (detect origin)
3) Suffering has a cessation is a Noble Truth (cessation = false)
4) Suffering has a path to end it is a Noble Truth (calculate distal cause from Noble mean)

Since cessation = false, create new instance of 4 Noble Truths:

Right view - What is Right View? 
1) Suffering is a Noble Truth (5 Upadana Khanda: form, feeling, perception, derivative matter, consciousness) (Suffering = True) Parse 5 clinging Khanda
2) Suffering has an origin is a Noble Truth (detect origin)
3) Suffering has a cessation is a Noble Truth (cessation = false)
4) Suffering has a path to end it is a Noble Truth (calculate distal cause from Noble mean)

Since Cessation is still false, create new instance of 4 Noble Truths:
Right view - What is Right View?
1) Suffering is a Noble Truth (5 Upadana Khanda: form, feeling, perception, derivative matter, consciousness) (Suffering = True) Parse 5 clinging Khanda
2) Suffering has an origin is a Noble Truth (detect origin)
3) Suffering has a cessation is a Noble Truth (cessation = true)
4) Suffering has a path to end it is a Noble Truth (calculate distal cause from Noble mean) 

Cessation = true.  End 

Now this is a HUGE SIMPLIFICATION of a masterpiece.  Unless you studied mathematics or computer science today, you probably did not see. Buddha solved the problem of suffering.  It's not just -- oh, you're suffering -- be good and meditate.  He literally solved the problem of suffering and gave it as his proof to all of us, except it took the rest of us 2500 years to even see the brilliance.

How? The 4 Noble Truths is an algorithm -- and it uses something called recursion!  We have in The Noble Eightfold Path "Right View" in which Buddha enters the recursive path -- The 4 Noble Truths! Read it again. 

A recursive algorithm solves a problem by referring to itself and creating instances of itself since --- suffering seems obvious enough to involve self-similarity. This is what Lord Buddha meant by "Atta" and "Anatta", he never said we had no soul, he said at a certain level we all display self similar patterns.  

This self similarity in an algorithm is stated as the "Base case" or "terminating case" - the Cessation of Suffering is the "base case" -- if this is false, the algorithm continues to create smaller instances of the 4 Noble Truths.  The base case prevents the 4 Noble Truths from entering an infinite loop.  It's dividing and conquering your suffering, one instance of itself at a time!  The perfectly balanced mind is the Noble Eightfold Path or the "mean", the function constantly checks how far you are from this "middle path" and finds a center of concentration.  It's a program to return you to a centered norm causing mental convergence or Samadhi/perfect concentration if the person acts in accordance with the Noble Eightfold Path.

Recursively defined mathematical objects include not only functions and sets but something called fractals.  Fractal mathematics is one of the newest branches of mathematics. 

Fractals are generally continuous everywhere but no where differentiable -- sounds like "Nibbana Dhatu" or Nibbana element in Buddhism.  Nibbana is called, "Asankhata" or the "unconstructed" non differentiable.  More importantly, it is not a function dependent on another function -- it is INDEPENDENT OF TIME.  

Ex. Velocity = 
That is why Buddha is called the "Amatassa Datta" or Giver of Immortality. This basically means Buddhism has a whole new mathematical model, making all old laws and religious works not be able to take one to Nibbana.  In other words, this is THE NEW LAW.  Those who use nonBuddhist mantras/texts don't know the new functions and won't be able to get Nibbana.  Understanding fractals basically means Buddha is able to make you and the ENTIRE WORLD whole again from examination of one single fragment since one fragment contains the whole -- that's what a fractal is!!!  It is NOT a coincidence that one of the first fractals to be pictured on a computer -- looks like the Buddha!!!  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set

The same set, modified looks so like the Buddha, it's actually called "Buddhabrot"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhabrot

Of course, Buddha can do all this in his clear head. Buddha reminds us that The 4 Noble Truths and the Hindu texts, The Torah (which he gives a correct version), the Entire Tipitika is just a handful of leaves of knowledge compared to the number of leaves in the forest which are countless -- not only are they countless he can make you continually count them as he regenerates those leaves through fractal equations so don't mess around with him -- that's why he's God.  However, if he takes you under his wings, you too can be a future Buddha. So take refuge in Buddha alone!

The First Noble Truth

 

dukkhaṃ ariyasaccaṃ: 

jātipi dukkhā jarāpi dukkhā vyādhipi dukkho maraṇampi dukkhaṃ appiyehi sampayogo dukkho piyehi vippayogo dukkho yampicchaṃ na labhati tampi dukkhaṃ saṅkhittena pańcupādānakkhandhā dukkhā".

"Suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, sickness is suffering, death is suffering, sorrow and lamentation, pain, grief and despair are suffering; association with the loathed is suffering, dissociation from the loved is suffering, not to get what one wants is suffering — in short, suffering is the five categories of clinging objects.

The Second Noble Truth

 

dukkhasamudayo ariyasaccaṃ: 

"yāyaṃ taṇhā ponobhavikā nandirāgasahagatā tatra tatrābhinandinī, seyyathīdaṃ: kāmataṇhā bhavataṇhā vibhavataṇhā" 

"The origin of suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

It is the craving that produces renewal of being accompanied by enjoyment and lust, and enjoying this and that; in other words, craving for sensual desires, craving for being, craving for non-being.

The Third Noble Truth
(Base Case)

 

dukkhanirodho ariyasaccaṃ:

yo tassāyeva taṇhāya asesavirāganirodho cāgo paṭinissaggo mutti anālayo. 

"Cessation of suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

It is remainderless fading and ceasing, giving up, relinquishing, letting go and rejecting, of that same craving.

The Fourth Noble Truth

 

dukkhanirodhagāminī paṭipadā ariyasaccaṃ

ayameva ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo, seyyathīdaṃ: sammādiṭṭhi sammāsaṅkappo sammāvācā sammākammanto sammāājīvo sammāvāyāmo sammāsati sammāsamādhi. 

"The way leading to cessation of suffering, as a noble truth, is this: 

It is simply the noble eightfold path, that is to say, right view, right intention; right speech, right action, right livelihood; right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

Noble Eightfold Path - Right View
(Recursive Step)

 

yaṃ kho bhikkhave dukkhe ńāṇaṃ dukkhasamudaye ńāṇaṃ dukkhanirodhe ńāṇaṃ dukkhanirodhagāminiyā paṭipadāya ńāṇaṃ, ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave sammādiṭṭhi. 

"And what is right view? Knowledge with regard to suffering, knowledge with regard to the origination of suffering, knowledge with regard to the cessation of suffering, knowledge with regard to the way of practice leading to the cessation of suffering: This is called right view.


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